Black Rice with BBQ Mango Shrimp

Black Rice with BBQ Mango Shrimp

 

 

I knew it wouldn’t be long for black rice to be on my dinner table after seeing it at Trader Joe’s. I had seen this rice posted on a visual menu of a Spanish arrocería (restaurant specializing in rice dishes), and I was curious to try it. The question became, what to do with it? A couple of dishes caught my attention on Pinterest. What caught my eye was the use of an orange colored food against the purple black color of the rice. Considering the time of the year, and for my taste, I decided it could be none other than black rice with BBQ mango shrimp.

Black rice is also know as “forbidden rice” because it was reserved for the Chinese Emperor, in the belief that the rice promoted health and longevity. What it has in common with brown rice is a similar chewiness and nutty flavor, and the nutritional benefits from the bran. Both types of rice are also effective for controlling weight, as compared to white rice (Nutrition Research).

What black offers that brown rice lacks are anthocyanin pigments that give the grain its purplish color. One very good thing to know about that is that you’ll have a lower risk of atherosclerosis by eating this food and other foods with the purplish hue like blueberries, beets, grapes, eggplant, and acai berries.

And if you’d like to hear a fun fact about black rice, you might be interested in knowing that you can use the rice as a natural dark purple dye. You might keep that in mind next time you want to color Easter eggs.

The mango shrimp marinade is delicious and it is loosely inspired by a marinated shrimp recipe by Emeril LaGasse. For my recipe, the shrimp is cooked on the bbq, but you can pan fry it if you prefer. Wipe of some of the marinade off the shrimp and cook it in about 1-1/2 tablespoons olive oil.

Now it’s your turn to try this healthy food. The rice is easy to make and it cooks up in about 35-40 minutes, even though the package indicated 30 minutes. What do you think about the black-purplish color? Be sure to let me know how you like it.

Additional Resource:

whfoods.org

Black Rice with BBQ Mango Shrimp

Prep Time: 40 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 20 minutes

Servings: 6 servings

Black Rice with BBQ Mango Shrimp

Ingredients:

  • Black Rice with Mango Shrimp
  • For the shrimp and the marinade:
  • 1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 3 tablespoons virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, minced
  • ¾ teaspoon cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne
  • 1 Serrano chile, minced
  • 1/3 cup mango puree
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • ¼ cup cilantro, chopped
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • For the Rice:
  • 1-1/2 cups black rice
  • 3 cups water
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons virgin olive oil
  • 1 bay leaf
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • For the Garnish:
  • 2 green onions, chopped into thirds and then shredded lengthwise
  • 1/3 cup cilantro leaves

Procedure:

    For the Rice:
  1. In a 10-inch casserole pan, sauté the onions in 1-1/2 tablespoons olive oil and cook them until they are translucent.
  2. Place 2 cups black rice in a sieve and rinse under cold water.
  3. Add the rice to the onions along with the bay leaf, the salt, and 4 cups of water.
  4. Bring the water to a simmer and cook on medium-low for 30-40 minutes, or until the water is absorbed.
  5. For the Shrimp:
  6. Place the peeled and deveined shrimp in a bowl with all the ingredients for the marinade and allow it to sit 30 minutes in the fridge.
  7. You can start to cook the rice while the shrimp is marinating.
  8. When your are ready to grill the shrimp heat the grill for 10 minutes on high (propane grill) and cook the shrimp about 3 minutes one each side. They will turn a shrink up and turn a whitish color when they are done. Be careful not to over cook them or they will be too dry.
  9. To Serve:
  10. Spoon the rice onto a platter, top with the shrimp, and cover with the cilantro and green onion garnish.
http://www.myhealthyeatinghabits.com/2014/06/11/black-rice-bbq-mango-shrimp/

Black Rice with BBQ Mango Shrimp

This recipe is also posted at Hearth and Soul, Tuesday’s Table, and The Yuck Stops Here.

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Chai Tea Biryani

Chai Tea Biryani

 

 

 

It’s National Vegetarian Week, and I’m doing my bit to create awareness about the benefits of eating less meat by sharing my recipe for vegan chai tea biryani rice.

There are many reasons why people become vegetarians, but probably the 3 most common reasons are: for better health, compassion for the animals, and to better the health of the planet.

According to USVegWeek.com “Nine billion land animals (and billions more aquatic animals) are raised and killed for food each year in the United States—that’s more than 1 million animals every hour.” There are several things wrong with this figure: It’s an unnecessary waste animal life, water resources, and land, and it’s unsustainable.

One book that I can recommend you to read about the unsustainability of the current practice of harvesting animals is Food Matters: A Guide to Conscious Eating by Mark Bittman. This book is written for vegetarians and non-vegetarians alike.

Whether we eat meat or not, by making a few changes in our diet, in the direction of eating less meat, we will be doing better for our own health, the well-being of animals and for the health of the planet.

This week the friendly women at theRecipeReDux challenged the group members to come up with a recipe that uses tea–like that was really a challenge. For me it had to be something with chai tea, or a variation of it. This biryani rice dish uses chai tea as the base liquid and it’s delicious! It’s also dairy free, vegetarian and vegan. Try it and let me know what you think about it.

You might also like the following recipes to celebrate National Vegetarian Week. They are all super yummy!

Wicked Vegan White Beans (vegan)

Mediterranean Garden Lasagna (vegetarian)

Vegetable Shu Mai (vegan)

Spicy Marinated Tofu (vegan)

 

Chai Tea Biryani

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 35 minutes

Total Time: 55 minutes

Serves: 4

Chai Tea Biryani

Ingredients:

  • Chai Tea Biryani
  • For the Tea:
  • 2-1/3 cups water
  • 1 teabag of chai tea
  • 2 1/3-inch slices of ginger
  • 5 green cardamom pods
  • 1 stick cinnamon
  • 1 star anise
  • 5 black peppercorns
  • For the Rice:
  • 1 cup Brown Jasmine Rice
  • 1 tablespoon olive
  • 1/2 cup onion, chopped
  • 2 cups plus 2 tablespoons chai tea
  • ½ cup coconut milk
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon cumin
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • Garnish:
  • ¼ cup cashews
  • ¼ cup raisins
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro or parsley

Procedure:

    For the Tea:
  1. Place 2-1/2 cups water in a small pot along with 1 bag of chai tea, 2 slices of ginger from a piece of ginger about 1-inch in diameter, 5 cardamom pods, 1 star anise, and 5 black peppercorns. Bring the water to a simmer and allow it to simmer for 5 minutes.
  2. Remove the tea from the heat and let it rest for 10 minutes.
  3. Strain the tea. You should have 2 cups plus 2 tablespoons of liquid remaining. If you are short of this amount add water to make up the difference.
  4. For the Rice:
  5. Pour 1 tablespoon olive oil in a 4-quart saucepan and sauté the onion until it is transparent.
  6. Add the salt, turmeric, cumin and raisins. Stir well.
  7. Add the tea, coconut milk, rice, and bay leaf. Stir, and bring the liquid to a simmer. Cover the pot tightly and cook on low heat until the rice absorbs the liquid, about 30 to 35 minutes.
  8. When with rice is done, fluff it up with a fork and then garnish with chopped cilantro or parsley, raisins and cashews.
http://www.myhealthyeatinghabits.com/2014/05/21/chai-tea-biryani/

 

This recipe is also posted at Hearth and SoulTuesday’s Table, and Wonderfully Creative Wednesdays.

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Chinese Rice Revisited

Chinese Rice Revisited

Chinese Rice Revisited

 

During the eighties Chinese food cooking was all the rage. The hot chefs who were inspiring everyone were Martin Yan, Ken Hom, Barbara Tropp, and Wolfgang Puck (fusion). Everyone was buying a wok and learning to cook spring rolls, won tons, Chinese rice and hot and sour soup. I was among them. And I bought books too: Chinese Snacks: Wei-chuan’s Cook Book, Ken Hom’s Chinese Cookery, and The Modern Art of Chinese Cooking by Barbara Tropp, and there were more, but somewhere along the way some were lost, or misplaced.

I was just starting to cook and learning something different and exotic (time warp), made cooking just that much more fun. We bought chop sticks too, and everyone in the family struggled as they learned to control the stick between their fingers. Some learned faster than others, some have yet to learn, myself included. I’m an expert at holding the bowl under the chin and scooping food into my mouth, but the fine art of picking up small pieces of food with long thin sticks has eluded me.

Last year Mary Bergfield’s blog group covered Gourmet Online’s 50 Women Game Changers; Barbara Tropp was on the list and it was fun revisiting her food. I made a modified version of her Won Ton Hamburger and it was really tasty. This week I thought it would be entertaining to revisit her book again. In The Modern Art of Chinese Cooking, she presents a recipe for the classic and iconic Chinese fried rice. I like fried rice, but I always found it a little boring and uninteresting. I pumped the recipe and modified it to make it healthier with whole grain rice and added vegetables for more color and flavor, and I skipped the frying which is unnecessary with whole grain rice because it has more fat than white rice.

Chinese Rice Revisited

Prep Time: 35 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes

Yield: About 7 cups

3/4 cup

Chinese Rice Revisited

Ingredients:

  • 2 carrots (about ¾ cup when chopped)
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2 eggs
  • 3-1/2 to 4 cups whole grain rice, cooked
  • 1/4 pound, spinach, cooked, squeezed and chopped
  • 6 ounces asparagus
  • 3/4 cup frozen peas, thawed
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 1 to 1-1/2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 6 stalks green onions, chopped to 1/4-inch
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons Tamari soy
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 spicy sausage, cubed to 1/3-inch (you may also us tofu sausage, or marinated tofu)

Procedure:

  1. Chop the carrots into 1/3-inch cubes and then blanch in boiling lightly salted water for 2-1/2 to 3 minutes. Test for doneness. They should be tender but not mushy. Rinse with cold water and drain.
  2. If the peas are frozen, cook them just enough to thaw them, and then rinse them and let them drain.
  3. Break the eggs into a small bowl and lightly whisk with a fork..] Heat the olive oil in a 8 to 10-inch frying pan. When it is hot, add the egg and swirl it around in the pan so the egg completely cover the bottom of the pan. The idea is to cook one side and then flip the eggs to finish cooking the other side. It should look like a flat disk when it is done. Allow it to cool, and then shred it into small pieces with a chef knife.
  4. Break off the ends of the asparagus stalk and discard them. Steam the stalks until they are tender but still slightly crispy. While they are cooking get a pan with 3 cups water and 2 cups of ice. When they are cooked to the correct point plunge them into the ice water to stop the cooking process. Drain them and then chop them into 1/3-inch pieces.
  5. Place the rice in a bowl with the eggs, asparagus, green onions, peas, carrots, spinach, sausage, sesame oil, rice vinegar, Tamari soy and salt. Stir well and check the seasonings. This dish can be eaten hot, or cold.

The final dish will look darker. I added the Tamari soy after I took the picture.

http://www.myhealthyeatinghabits.com/2013/11/15/chinese-rice-revisited/

Chinese Rice Revisited 2

Chinese Rice Revisited

This post is also listed at Tuesday Talent Show, Slightly Indulgent Tuesday, Pinceptive Blog Hop, and Full Plate Thursday.

Healthy Recipe: Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya

Jambalaya

 

This year Mardi Gras falls on Tuesday the 21st.  The literal meaning of Mardi Gras is “Fat Tuesday,” and it’s the last day before Ash Wednesday, a Catholic holy day, and the first day of lent. Another way of saying Mardi Gras is PARTY!! In New Orleans and other places around the world, people are out for the last hurrah because after Fat Tuesday there won’t be (as) much partying for the next 40 days during lent. At least that’s the idea.

One Louisiana favorite dish is jambalaya, and it is consumed by tourists and New Orleans natives every year. It’s one is one of my favorite dishes to make—especially for a large crowd because it’s so easy to make. You just throw all the ingredients into a baking pan, cover with foil, and let the oven do its work. My sister, who lives in Louisiana, gave me a good recipe for jambalaya some years back, very tasty—but I thought it had too much butter and not enough rice for the amount of chicken and shrimp the recipe called for, so I made some adjustments with delicious results.

The recipe calls for Uncle Ben’s converted rice, which is the same thing as parboiled rice. I was skeptical about posting a recipe that called for this type of rice until I found out that nutritionally, it is about 80% as good as brown rice, so it is a better choice than white rice, and almost as good as brown rice. The process of parboiling rice goes back about 2000 years. You may want to read more about the process at Wikipedia. Parboiled rice doesn’t get overcooked as easily as other types of rice either, which break down, and become heavy and pasty, so it cooks up nicely when making a large amount.

Healthy Recipe: Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya

Prep Time: 35 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 45 minutes

Total Time: 2 hours, 20 minutes

!14-16 servings

Healthy Recipe: Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups Uncle Ben’s convert rice, original
  • 1-1/2 pounds chicken, cut into ¾ inch cubes
  • 1 pound shrimp, peeled, deveined, and cut into ¾ inch cubes
  • 3/4 pound smoked sausage, sliced to 1/3 inch thickness
  • 5 tablespoons olive oil
  • ¾ cup chopped parsley
  • 3-1/2 cups beef broth,
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 eight-ounce cans of tomato sauce
  • 1-1/4 onion, chopped finely
  • 14 scallions, chopped
  • 1-1/2 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1-1/3 tablespoons thyme
  • 1-1/3 teaspoons black pepper
  • *Note about salt – the amount of salt you need will depend on whether you are using homemade stock, or canned stock. Canned stock and tomato sauce already contain salt so adjust accordingly.
  • 2 lemons - cut into small wedges for garnish

Procedure:

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 400°
  2. Put all the ingredients into a roasting pan (12 x 16 x 2-1/2), stir well, cover with tin foil and place the pan in the oven.
  3. Bake for 45 minutes. After this time is up, remove the pan from the oven and stir well. Put the foil back on and bake 45 minutes to 1 hour more.
  4. Serve with a bread and large green salad.
http://www.myhealthyeatinghabits.com/2012/02/20/healthy-recipe-chicken-and-shrimp-jambalaya/

*Note* – the recipe was updated January 14th, 2014, to add 1/2 pound more chicken and to increase the cooking time.