Vegetable Shu Mai – #SundaySupper

Vegetable Shu Mai 2

 

Happy Mother’s Day! When I signed up to take part in the Supper Sunday Movement’s Mother’s Day event, I knew right away that I wanted to make Shu Mai! And it gets better because I’m making vegetable shu mai!

A couple of weeks ago I posted a recipe for my favorite pork shu mai and I believe that some of my vegetarian and vegan readers were disappointed with that choice. Beef, pork, and poultry do occasionally appear on my plate, but I prefer with vegetable dishes most often. So today’s recipe is for all you veggie lovers out there. This recipe is also to celebrate my mother on Mother’s Day. Years ago my mother and I signed up and took cooking lessons together at Montana Mercantile, in Brentwood, California. It was a lot of fun taking the classes together and even more fun getting into the kitchen and trying out all the recipes we learned. We learned French cuisine, Italian, and Chinese. My favorite at the time was Chinese—I loved making and eating spring rolls and dumplings, soups and stir-fries. I still do, but not as often.

My Mom is an excellent cook too! Both she and my dad loved having the whole family—eight of us including my grandmother—sit down for long drawn out Sunday evening meal. She’d spend all day in the kitchen making the meal with all the trimmings, she’d put out the special china and crystal glasses and we have memorable meal. The food was fantastic, it always was. The most memorable thing about the meals was just being in good company with the family and enjoying the moment. The Sunday Supper Movement is doing an important job of bringing back Sunday family meals, and I support the group’s mission. In the company of family you can learn social skills like giving, receiving, accepting, listening, getting along with others, treating others well, and you can also learn to appreciate good food. So l’d like to thank my mom for being a good teacher, great cook, and a loving mother.

Vegetable Shu Mai – #SundaySupper

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 16 minutes

Total Time: 46 minutes

Yield: about 35 shu mai

Serving Size: 7 servings, 5 each

Vegetable Shu Mai – #SundaySupper

Ingredients:

    Sauce:
  • 1 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • ¼ teaspoon sesame seed oil
  • For the Filling:
  • 1 pound napa cabbage, finely shredded
  • 1 carrot shredded
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, and more if needed
  • 1 ounce dried shitake mushrooms
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1-½ tablespoons minced ginger
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • ½ can water chestnuts, finely chopped (from 8-ounce can)
  • 2 tablespoons thinly sliced green onion tops
  • ¼ cup chopped cilantro
  • ¼ teaspoon finely ground black pepper
  • 35 won ton wrappers

Procedure:

  1. Bring a 1 cup of water to a boil and then add the dried mushrooms to the water. Remove the pot from the heat and let the mushrooms soak for 10 minutes.
  2. Place the shredded carrot and the shredded cabbage together in a large bowl and toss well to combine.
  3. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large pan. When the oil is hot add ½ the cabbage mixture and cook until the cabbage starts to shrink, and then add the remaining cabbage and cook until it is tender, about 8 minutes.
  4. Stir in the garlic and ginger and cook for 1 minute.
  5. Turn off the heat and add the water chestnuts, cilantro, green onions, and black pepper.
  6. Drain and rinse the mushrooms. Cut off the stem and discard it. Chop the mushrooms into ¼ size pieces. Add them to the cabbage and place the cabbage mixture in a colander to drain out excess moisture, and then squeeze out the excess moisture.
  7. Place about a tablespoon of the filling and place it in the middle of a wrapper. bring up the sides of the wrapper up and twist the sides of the wrapper clockwise. This will form clockwise pleats around the filling. Place all 5 fingers around the middle of the pouch and lightly push down so the bottom of the dumpling forms a flat base. As you push down some of the filling will ooze up through the center. This is expected and desired for the finished dumpling. Keep the Shu Mai covered with a lightly damped tea towel or paper towel until your are ready to steam them.
  8. Pour water into a 12-inch skillet until it reaches the level of about 3/4 inch. Place a steamer basket into the skillet and place an oiled plate on top of the steamer.
  9. Arrange the shu mai on top of the plate spaced ½-inch to 1-inch away from one another. Do not allow them to touch or they will stick together
  10. Cover the pan and steam about 6 to 8 minutes until they are cooked through and then serve immediately with the sauce.
  11. Check the water level and add more if necessary, and repeat the steaming process until they are all cooked.
  12. If you like, you can pan fry the shu mai after steaming it. Add a couple of teaspoons of olive oil to a pan and cook the dumplings on the bottom and on 2 sides.
  13. For the Sauce:
  14. Get out two small dipping bowls, about ¾ cup in size.
  15. Place 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoons red wine vinegar and ¼ teaspoon sesame oil into each bowl; or use 1-1/2 tablespoon lite soy to 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar and 1/4 teaspoon sesame oil.

Shu mai can be eaten just after steaming, or you may also pan fry it if you like after steaming.

http://www.myhealthyeatinghabits.com/2014/05/11/vegetable-shu-mai-sundaysupper/

Vegetable Shu Mai

Points Plus Value 33: Points Plus value per serving 5 – there are 7 servings.

Screen Shot 2014-05-10 at 12.56.44 PM

This weekend, we are celebrating MOMS around the world with our Mother’s Day Sunday Supper Menu. What’s on your menu for Mother’s Day this year? Drop by and say hello to our host for this week, Liz from That Skinny Chick Can Bake (tell her Happy Mother’s Day while you’re there), and then check out this awesome menu that we have planned!

Mother’s Day Breakfast:

Mother’s Day Appetizers:

Mother’s Day Soups, Salads and Sides:

Mother’s Day Main Dishes:

Mother’s Day Desserts:

Sunday Supper Movement

Join the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET.  Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. Check out our #SundaySupper Pinterest board for more fabulous recipes and food photos.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement.

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Goat Cheese and Peppers Cracker Canapé

Goat Cheese and Peppers Canapé

 

 

“I received free samples of Breton Gluten Free Original with Flax and Breton Gluten Free Herb and Garlic from Dare Foods Incorporated mentioned in this post. By posting this recipe I am entering a recipe contest sponsored by Dare Foods Incorporated and am eligible to win prizes associated with the contest. I was not compensated for my time.”

 

Dare Foods and TheRecipeRedux are joining forces during celiac disease awareness month to promote education about the disease, and I am doing my bit to help out by providing some information and a recipe for goat cheese and peppers cracker canapé.

The first thing most people would ask is what is Celiac Disease and who is affected by it? It is a intestinal disease that damages the small intestine when a person with celiac disease eats a food containing gluten. When a person with celiac disease eats a food with gluten the body responds by destroying the villi, that line the small intestine and which aid in the absorption of nutrients.

It is estimated that 1% of Americans has celiac disease, and it affects men, women and children across the board. For many individuals it can take as long as 6-10 years to get diagnosed, and there is no pharmaceutical cure for the disease. The only cure for people with this disease is a 100% gluten free diet. To learn more about the disease and the symptoms click this link.

To help people with celiac disease Dare Foods has released 2 new gluten free products, Breton Gluten Free Original with Flax, and Breton Gluten Free Herb and Garlic.

Benton Crackers

Up until a month ago I thought that any gluten free food item probably tasted inferior to other baked goods, until I learned that baked items like crackers and quick breads, that don’t require yeast can taste just as good or even better than items with gluten. There are two reasons for this: they don’t need gluten, and added gluten, in the case of crackers, only makes them tougher and less crispy. I was pleasantly surprised by of taste of these crackers. They taste just as good as the other Breton crackers that I often buy. I think anyone who likes crackers will enjoy Breton Gluten Free Original with Flax, and Breton Gluten Free Herb and Garlic.

Goat Cheese and Peppers Cracker Canapé 3

Goat Cheese and Peppers Cracker Canapé

Total Time: 15 minutes

Yield: about 16

Serving Size: 3 to 4 canapés per person

Goat Cheese and Peppers Cracker Canapé

Ingredients:

  • 1 box Breton Gluten Free Cracker, Original with Flax or Herb and Garlic
  • 1 ounce roll goat cheese
  • 1 jar roasted bell peppers
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons capers
  • 1 bunch dill (3-4 tablespoons will suffice if you have it on hand)

Procedure:

  1. Carefully slice the goat cheese into medallions about 1/4 inch thick and place one medallion on top of each cracker.
  2. Slice the bell peppers into strips about 1/4 inch wide by 2-1/2 to 3 inches long.
  3. If you have two different colors of peppers, place them side by side and roll them into a spiral and then place the spiral on top of the cheese.
  4. For variety roll some of the spiral peppers with a single color.
  5. Top the canapés with 1-3 capers and a sprig of dill, or dill alone, or capers alone
http://www.myhealthyeatinghabits.com/2014/05/08/goat-cheese-peppers-cracker-canape/

 

Goat Cheese and Peppers Canapé 2

Resources:

http://www.celiaccentral.org/celiac-disease/facts-and-figures/

http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/#what

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/CDCFactSheets2_Symptoms.pdf

This recipe is also posted on Hearth and Soul,  SimpleSupperTuesday, and Full Plate Thursday

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My Favorite Pork Shu Mai

Pork Shu Mai

 

 

Shu mai, siu mai, shumai, or shaumai. No matter how you say it or write it, shu mai is an outstanding Chinese dim sum appetizer that no one can seem to get enough of, at least not in my family. My boys could eat this dish every week and never tire of it. Whenever I ask what appetizers they think I should make for a special dinner, inevitably the coral response is shu mai. You might wonder what makes it so good. It’s all in the right blend of savory ingredients: pork, ginger, cilantro, and garlic. And there’s also the pasta that it’s all wrapped up in. Shu Mai is versatile but generally you’ll see it made of pork, chicken, or shrimp, or a mixture of any of these. Guests love it and ask for the recipe. You just can’t go wrong with it.

Part of the fun of making shumai is that it smells so good when it’s steamed, and it can be enjoyable making the dumplings, especially if you have small children who want to get in on the action. Before I was married my own family went through a phase of eating Chinese food. We ate a lot of spring rolls, Chinese rice, and stir-frys. About the same time I was working for Sharon Singstock, a caterer in Malibu, and one of her specialties was a Chinese theme spread consisting of a stir-fry, Chinese chicken salad, spring rolls, and shu mai. So I have done my fair share of rolling and stuffing. Now that I think about it, working with the caterer came first and her food spilled over in my family’s way of cooking.

One of my favorite books is The Modern Art of Chinese Cooking, by Barbara Tropp; it’s still on my bookshelf today. Another book I enjoyed learning about Chinese food from is Ken Hom’s Chinese Cookery. Both of their shu mai recipes are very good; mine is a little more kicked up with with the flavorings. If you’ve never tried your hand at Chinese cuisine maybe you should give it a try. The results taste sooo good!

 

Related Recipes: Won Ton Hamburger,  and Chinese Rice Revisited

 

Disclaimer: Please note that the books listed above are  Amazon links are affiliate links and I will earn a commission if you purchase through them. I use the books mentioned and I recommend them because they are useful.

Pork Shu Mai

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 50 minutes

Yield: 40 dumplings

Pork Shu Mai

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb ground pork
  • 2 tablespoons ginger, minced
  • 3 green onions, finely chopped
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons cilantro, minced
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons garlic, minced
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons lite soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons rice wine or sherry
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • ¼ teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • 1 package won ton or gyoza wrappers (40 wrappers needed)
  • 1 head green leaf lettuce, or Napa cabbage
  • 1/3 cup lite soy sauce, divided
  • 1/3 cup red wine vinegar, divided

Procedure:

    Make the Dumplings:
  1. Put the first nine ingredients into a bowl and mix together well.
  2. Place about 1 tablespoon of filling into a wrapper, bring up the sides of the wrapper up. Twist the sides of the wrapper clockwise. This will form clockwise pleats around the filling. Place all 5 fingers around the middle of the pouch and lightly push down so the bottom of the dumpling forms a flat base. As you push down some of the filling will ooze up through the center. This is expected and desired for the finished dumpling (1st picture of four). Keep the Shu Mai covered with a lightly damped tea towel or paper towel until your are ready to steam them.
  3. Prepare the Steamer: (**See Notes)
  4. Pour water into a 12-inch skillet until it reaches the level of about 3/4 inch. Place a steamer basket into the skillet and line with lettuce or cabbage leaves.
  5. Place the shu mai on top of the leaves spaced ½-inch away from one another. Do not allow them to touch or they will stick together (2nd, 3rd and 4th pictures of 4).
  6. Cover the pan and steam about 8 to 10 minutes until they are cooked through and then serve immediately with the sauce.
  7. Check the water level and add more if necessary, and repeat the steaming process until they are all cooked.
  8. For the Sauce:
  9. Get out two small dipping bowls, about ¾ cup in size.
  10. Put 3 tablespoons of soy sauce and 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar in each bowl. Stir to mix.

**Notes:

1. To steam the shu mai you can use stacked bamboo steamer baskets if you have them. Placed them in a wok with an inch of inch water; otherwise, you can set up a stainless steel steamer basket in a 12-inch skillet with 1-inch of water in the bottom of the pan.

2. Instead of using lettuce leaves or cabbage leaves you can lightly oil a plate, place the dumplings on top of it and put it on top of the steamer basket in the skillet (non-traditional way).

http://www.myhealthyeatinghabits.com/2014/04/13/my-favorite-pork-shu-mai/

Weight Watcher’s Points Plus: 6, and there are 8 servings.

Nutrition-Facts-Shu-Mai

Pork Shu Mai 2

Wickedly Good California Cream Cheese Appetizer

California Cream Cheese Appetizer

 

 

“I received a gift card to offset the expense of my ingredients. By posting this recipe I am entering a recipe contest sponsored by the California Milk Advisory Board and am eligible to win prizes associated with the contest. I was not compensated for my time.”

 

The recipe I’m sharing with you today is a wickedly good California cream cheese appetizer. Most people who have been to my house for dinner know the one I’m talking about; the one that shocks you (in a good way) when you find out what it is. Its take one or two minutes to prepare and it’s awfully good. At least that’s the response everyone seems to have.

Today is the last day to enter the contest sponsored by The Recipe Redux and the California Milk Advisory Board. I wasn’t even thinking of entering this recipe because I already posted a beautiful entry for Homemade Yogurt –  3 Favors, but last night we were celebrating my son Gabriel’s completion of a master’s in Anthropology, and his upcoming military enlistment. His friend Max was raving about the dip I made (to be posted later). “But, he said, “I always remember the cream cheese appetizer you made at another party a couple of years ago. It’s the best appetizer I ever had!” At that moment I knew I had to post it. And truthfully, I get a kick out of seeing the look of surprise on people’s faces when I tell them what the three simple ingredients are.

Here’s how California comes into the picture: I was raised in California and my best friend’s mother made this delectable treat at all the block parties, and then my mom started making it, as well as the neighbors up and down the street; and it’s made with California milk cream cheese.

To make the recipe I chose to replace the cream cheese with Neufchatel cheese which has one-third less the calories from fat compared to cream cheese. The brand I buy is Challenge Dairy, which is the largest selling brand in the west. Their butter is also very good and I buy it for making cookies because they just taste better with Challenge.

Links: RealCaliforniaMilk.com, HealthyEating.Org

Wickedly Good California Cream Cheese Appetizer

Prep Time: 3 minutes

Total Time: 3 minutes

Yield: 10 Tablespoons

Serving Size: 1 to 1-2 tablespoons per person

Wickedly Good California Cream Cheese Appetizer

This is a pre-lunch or dinner appetizer. Serve with various crackers and an assortment of chopped vegetables.

Ingredients:

  • 5 ounces California Neufchatel cheese (I use Challenge)
  • 1-1/2 to 2 tablespoons light soy sauce, or Tamari soy
  • 1-1/2 to 2 tablespoons sesame seeds (toasted or untoasted)

Procedure:

  1. Slice the Neufchatel cheese bar into 5 crosswise strips about 1/2 inch thick (figure on 8 strips per bar)
  2. Place the strips on a plate and spoon on the soy sauce.
  3. Sprinkle on the sesame seeds.
http://www.myhealthyeatinghabits.com/2014/03/15/wickedly-good-california-cream-cheese-appetizer/

California Cream Cheese Appetizer 2

This recipe is also posted at Thriving on Thursdays and Show Stopper Saturday

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